Key Art from My Lord, What a Night (2016). Photos of Albert Einstein and Marian Anderson are at the top of the image. The image of a white house is at the bottom.
Liberty Live Commission

My Lord, What a Night

Oct 13 - 16, 2016
written by Deborah Brevoort
directed by Kel Haney

Based on actual events, My Lord, What a Night provides a thought-provoking account of the night legendary singer Marian Anderson spent at the home of Albert Einstein. What begins as an event that threatens to divide the Princeton community ends with a lifetime bond between two of New Jersey’s most fascinating people of the 20th century.

Key Art from Las Cruces (2016). Set in the desert, a small home is at the forefront of the image.
Play Festival Winner

Las Cruces

Sep 1 - 18, 2016
written by Vincent Delaney
directed by John J. Wooten

Out in the New Mexico desert, not far from the casinos and the spaceport, Sheridan is camped out, hiding in a gutted trailer. Everyone knows he’s there, but no one knows why. Except maybe a card player named Soledad.

Key Art from Water by the Spoonful (2016). Water is being poured onto a spoon. Because it can only hold so much water is spilling out around it.
Play Festival Winner

Water by the Spoonful

July 14 - 31, 2016
written by Quiara Alegría Hudesi
directed by Kel Haney

Elliot, an Iraq War vet and his cousin Yazmin, a recent divorcee, search for a way out from the shadows. Odessa, Elliot’s estranged mother, has found her escape – a new online family of fellow addicts who she can keep stable and sober each and every day. As the fractured family negotiates the limitations of loyalty, friendship, and community, they also discover acceptance and grace. A stirring portrait of redemption and forgiveness.

Key Art from Three Rules for the Dragon (2016). A chair is at the center of the image. A single light from the ceiling shines down onto the chair. A teddy bear has been left on the floor by the legs of the chair.
Play Festival Runner-Up

Three Rules for the Dragon

June 17 - 19, 2016
written by Jeff Talbott
directed by Wes Grantom

Douglas Barnes has a job. It’s not the job his wife thinks he has. And balancing his work life and his home life is taking its toll. Three Rules for the Dragon is an intense and probing new drama about Douglas’s eternal struggle to get information from a suspected terrorist, while also trying to salvage a marriage that hangs in the balance.

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